How Regular Exercise Reduce Adult Cancer Risk, Beat Menopause

How Regular Exercise Reduce Adult Cancer Risk, Beat Menopause

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cancer2RESEARCHERS assessing the health of women aged 40 to 70 have suggested that the amount of exercise they participate in during their teenage years appears to have an impact on theirrisk of dying from cancer or other causes as adults,
A young girl is playing tennis. 
 The study was conducted by Sarah J. Nechuta, an assistant professor of medicine at Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center in Nashville, TN, and colleagues.
Their findings are published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.
Participating in exercise as an adolescent was associated with a reduced risk of cancer and all- cause mortality, regardless of the level of exercise attained by the women assessed in the study as adults, the authors state.
  Previous research has indicated that healthy living can have far-reaching health benefits. Medical News Today reported on a study published earlier this year in JAMA Oncology that found men who kept a high level of fitness in their midlife would be less likely to die from certain cancers after the age of 65 than less fit peers.
In particular, the risk of men with high cardiorespiratory fitness were 55 per cent less likely to develop lung cancer and 44% less 0- likely to develop colorectal cancer than men with low cardiorespiratory fitness.
According to Prof. Nechuta, it is vitally importarit that researchers & work toward understanding the long-term impact of modifiable lifestyle factors such as exercise a during adolescence.
Research into this area can have public le health implications for disease prevention over the course of life, she explains.
For the study, data were obtained from the Shanghai Women’s Health Study (SWHS), a population-based prospective study that has followed around 75,000 women in Shanghai, China, since 1996, recording specific causes of death and the incidence of specific cancers in the cohort.
The SWHS is funded by the National Cancer Institute and is led by Dr. WeiZheng of the Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center. Participating women are interviewed in person every two to three years to collect baseline and follow-up data, including information on adult lifestyle-related factors and mortality outcomes.
Information obtained at the beginning of the study included self-reported exercise participation between the ages of 13-19 and blood and urine samples.
Meanwhile, British scientists say regular exercise eases the misery the of the menopause and could be a natural alternative to Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT).
Women who worked up a sweat in the gym suffered half as many hot flushes as those with a more sedentary lifestyle, a study found.
And the flushes they did have were less severe.
Researchers said that in future women in their late 40S and early 50s could be prescribed exercise as an alternative to hormone replacement
therapy.
Women who worked up a sweat in the gym suffered half as many hot flushes as those with a more sedentary lifestyle; a study found. And the flushes they did have were less severe.
Women who worked up a sweat in the gym suffered half as many hot flushes as those with a more sedentary lifestyle, a study found. And the flushes they did have were less severe.
Other experts said that gentle exercise, such as gardening, can also help.
The most common and distressing symptom of the at menopause, hot flushes cae disturb sleep, drain energy and cause embarrassment. A single flush can last from a few) seconds to a whole hour.

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